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Art Talk: Stephanie Jung

Stephanie Jung

New York VI

I am thrilled to have on this week’s Art Talk the photographs of Stephanie Jung. Stephanie hails from Schifferstadt, a small town in South-West Germany and has been creating art through her photographs since her days studying visual communications.

Stephanie’s strong individual perspective and unquestionable skills make this would-be photographer green with envy.  Her photos capture the distinct character of various cities through the use of multiple exposure photography, a technique she’s been honing since her early years of experimentation. As a result her photos communicate vibration, manic movement, transience and slight shifts in perspective – all as if rendered in slow motion.  These traits paint a picture of a fleeting contemporary urban life.

To a city-dweller, like myself, these scenes should feel “normal” as this is the world in which we are surrounded, however Stephanie’s work feels ethereal, transporting the viewer to dream-like versions of her chosen cities. She even breathes new life into cities that suffer from tourism overexposure such as Tokyo, Paris, or New York – cities we are used to viewing on postcards or fridge magnets displayed in many a camera-toting tourists’ home.  Stephanie’s perspective on these cities is fresh, invigorating, and very much her own.


Tell us, Stephanie, what was it like in the earlier stages of exploring multiple exposure photography?

I realized that I like abstract photography during my internship, where I learned a lot from a professional photographer, she really inspires me with her work. I love how you can show movement with blur, I really love abstract photos and the mood they create.
The multiple-exposure shots was something I discovered when I was in Paris. I spent one day at the La Defense district, which is very busy most of the time. There was one moment when I wanted to increase this mood, so I started to experiment. Although I liked the results, I didn’t continue working on it until I visited Japan one year later. I was fascinated by this country, especially the big cities like Tokyo. That’s where I started to work on multiple exposures again, it was the perfect way for me to intensify the feeling of Japan.

Museumsinsel

Museumsinsel


Your photographs comment about the transient life in cities so eloquently. As a viewer and a city dweller, I think your work captures the ephemeral part of living in a big city. How easy or difficult was it to arrive at this way of presenting your narrative?

Well, this was a process which I didn’t enforce. I started to focus on abstract photography because I was fascinated about the possibilities you have in photography. Taking classic pictures was something I was bored with in the beginning. During my internship where I spent a lot of time with a photographer and later friend in Berlin, I asked myself why I’m taking those photographs and why I choose those motives and experimental styles. So I started to think about the things in life I’m dealing with, what I’m thinking about and what I was questioning in life. This combined with looking at my early photographs I found out it’s the movement in life which matters to me and which I want to show in my works. So this all happened without me pushing my photographs in a specific direction, it was just something I did automatically.

Stephanie Jung

Berlin Collection


You’ve also depicted the pulsating, reverberating characters of cities like NY and Paris. You’ve shown quieter sides of Berlin and the calm side of Kyoto. And your Scotland photos exude whimsy. How do you ensure that you capture the variety of characteristics that different cities possess?

This is a very intuitive process. When I visit specific cities, I walk through the streets, see some famous sights but also unknown places which I randomly discover. Every person experiences a place very differently, not everyone likes all facets or a city in general, others do. With my work I’m showing my personal view of a place, how I am seeing it. To see and feel the varying characters of a city, you simply have to explore it.

It’s easier for me to capture a city, which I’ve never been to or which I don’t know that well. For example, I find it hard to portrait my hometown, which I know perfectly. Every time I try to take pictures of it, I’m not happy with the result. I know every corner of this place, this makes it hard to change my view of it and see new, interesting things which I find worth capturing. A friend and photographer once said to me, if you accomplish to photograph your hometown and be satisfied with the result, you’re a good photographer. I’m curious about the day I will manage that.

Stephanie Jung

Himeji


How do you choose then which not-so-familiar cities to photograph?

On the one hand, I’m taking photographs during my private travels. Not every place is suitable for this kind of photography, although I’m always trying to achieve a good photo.

On the other hand there are cities which I’d love to visit and take pictures of to continue my series. These are mostly big cities like Hong Kong or again, New York. What I’m looking for is an unique, mostly modern, architecture with many structures and a unique cityscape.

Citylife

Citylife

 

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given about your art?

My late friend and photographer Sabine Wenzel gave me the advice to not randomly take photographs, just because I’m passionate about it. It’s important to find a theme in photography which you’re always working on. To find something which is important to you and what you want to express through your art.


What’s the best piece of advice you’d given anyone about their art?

Of course that’s the best advice I have been given, as I think it’s so important for your art and changes a lot in your process. I would be silly if I wouldn’t share this valuable advice.

Gion

Gion

 

Stephanie Jung

The Artist, Stephanie Jung


How do you see your work evolving? What’s next for you?

I’m currently exploring other fields of photography as well. Since 2014 I’m also focusing on people and portrait photography. It’s so different from my usual work, but I’m having a lot of fun, as I can work with people and it’s always a challenge for me to capture the character of someone. This is something I’ll keep doing as I enjoy the balance of client work and my personal art.

Also, one goal for 2016 is to combine my art with people photography. I started to work on it last year, but only randomly, so this is something I’d like to extend in future.

 

Interviewed by: Jing Palad


Art Pieces by Stephanie Jung

Himeji

Framed and Signed Giclee art print (2015). Limited Edition of 50 copies with certificates of authenticity. Exclusively edited by Curioos. This Art print is signed, numbered and stamped by Curioos. Each copy comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity.
$315.00

Gion

Framed and Signed Giclee art print (2015). Limited Edition of 50 copies with certificates of authenticity. Exclusively edited by Curioos. This Art print is signed, numbered and stamped by Curioos. Each copy comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity.
$315.00

Curiocity III

Framed and Signed Giclee art print (2015). Limited Edition of 50 copies with certificates of authenticity. Exclusively edited by Curioos. This Art print is signed, numbered and stamped by Curioos. Each copy comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity.
$315.00

Curiocity II

Framed and Signed Giclee art print (2015). Limited Edition of 50 copies with certificates of authenticity. Exclusively edited by Curioos. This Art print is signed, numbered and stamped by Curioos. Each copy comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity.
$315.00

Closing Time

Framed and Signed Giclee art print (2015). Limited Edition of 100 copies with certificates of authenticity. Exclusively edited by Curioos. This Art print is signed, numbered and stamped by Curioos. Each copy comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity.  
$255.00

Citylife

Framed and Signed Giclee art print (2015). Limited Edition of 100 copies with certificates of authenticity. Exclusively edited by Curioos. This Art print is signed, numbered and stamped by Curioos. Each copy comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity.  
$200.00

Berlin Collection

Framed and Signed Giclee art print (2015). Limited Edition of 50 copies with certificates of authenticity. Exclusively edited by Curioos. This Art print is signed, numbered and stamped by Curioos. Each copy comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity.
$315.00

Berlin 01

Framed and Signed Giclee art print (2015). Limited Edition of 100 copies with certificates of authenticity. Exclusively edited by Curioos. This Art print is signed, numbered and stamped by Curioos. Each copy comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity.
$200.00

Alexanderplatz

Framed and Signed GiclŽe art print (2015). Limited Edition of 50 copies with certificates of authenticity. Exclusively edited by Curioos. This Art print is signed, numbered and stamped by Curioos. Each copy comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity.  
$315.00

Art Talk: Haydee Torres

Nicole

Nicole

This week we continue our conversations with some of today’s most promising artists, turning our focus to Haydee Torres and her work.  Haydee combines the strength and diaphaneity of her colors with the grit and gentleness found in the women in her portraits.  This careful balance helps her work exude both fragile beauty and stability, and makes it hard for art lovers to resist.


I’d like to go into detail about your work but first, please tell us more about you.


Where are you from?
I was born in New York, but my family relocated to Puerto Rico very early on in my life.


Where are you currently living and working?

I am currently living in Fort Lauderdale, Florida; my studio is located in my home.


How did you get your start as an artist?

I first discovered my passion for art while completing a fashion design program at the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale. While taking my required courses, I found a particular interest in fashion illustration and my instructors further encouraged me to develop my drawing skills. This was a very important and exciting time for me. These were the first encounters in which I had found those around me referring to me as an artist which was a huge moment of revelation for me. Later on, I began taking drawing classes at a local college. One of my professors told me that he believed I had reached a high enough skill level to justify selling my work, which was an idea that both intimidated and exhilarated me.

Ruffle and Pink

Ruffle and Pink


Please describe to us your process and your approach.

Before I begin a piece, I take time to formulate a kind of mental image of what I would like to translate onto the canvas. There has to be a certain sort of craving to use a specific medium, which is the part of the process that I find truly exciting. The rest of the process is planning and is oftentimes very calm and almost ritual, but it can also be an extremely fast and disorganized process. I prefer to be listening to music, mostly piano such as Phillip Glass. Most of the time I find myself wondering and having this mental discussion about almost everything. I always been a thinker and preoccupied with existence, purpose and the different experiences that a person goes thought during their lives. As the piece develops, I take many photos to fix  mistakes and make sure that the composition works and the colors are well balanced.

Haydee Torres A Moment in Time

A Moment in Time


Women figure prominently in your work. What is the reason behind this? and what are some of the characters of the women on these portraits?

My work is very selfish because  it is about me. Not physically but about the female in me. My women are representing a modern woman that has a real battle to get where she stands. That is why they are beautiful, tall hair like a crown and strong. I work from photos most of the time but sometimes my daughter will pose for me.


Because of your approach to color it would be easy to connect your work to fauvism. How do you feel about this association?
I can understand the connection. My approach to color is very spontaneous. I also associate my usage of color with expressionism, but I most definitely find that connection to be an extremely valid one. I like to leave a sense of mystery to my pieces so that the viewer can interpret them in their own unique way, so I really do think my work can be connected with several different styles.

Orange in Red

Orange in Red

Who or what has been the biggest influence on your thinking?
When I started painting my may influence was fashion. As I evolve I have became more interested in contemporary figurative work and expressionist art.


What fascinates you most about the work that you do?

The process. Because I don’t have formal painting education I have a very unorthodox way of painting.Also acrylics are quite challenging when it come to the figure ,I have to figure it out as I go.


In your statement, you mention that your work encourages the viewer to develop their own narrative. What has been the most interesting interpretation of your work that you’ve come across?

I will say that a lot of my female customers they connect with the painting in a personal level and they can see themselves as the figure in the canvas. When I had have the opportunity of meeting my customers in person they have this curiosity about the feelings of the woman in the painting.And that is when the narrative begins. For some people it is about just questioning for other they explain to me what is going on, so it is wonderful how everybody has a different narrative.

Interviewed by: Jing Palad


Art Pieces by Haydee Torres

Ruffle and Pink

This painting is on a gallery wrapped canvas with finished black edges. It comes varnished and ready to hang.
$550.00

ORANGE ON RED

Contemporary Abstract painting on a 24 x 24 x 3/4 inches Gallery Wrap canvas. Varnish and wired. All sides has been painted black. Signed and dated on the back. Ready for hanging.
$545.00

Nicole

This piece is a charcoal and pastel drawing on a 12x12 cradled wood panel. The work is sealed with varnish for protection and comes wired to hang.

Morning Tea

This painting is on a gallery wrapped canvas with finished black edges. It comes varnished and ready to hang.

A Moment in Time

This painting is on a gallery wrapped canvas with finished black edges. It comes varnished and wired to hang.


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